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Real Christmas Trees in Pots

February 8, 2022 Jill Raver
Filed in: Tree Information

Most people feel strongly about their preference for real or fake Christmas trees. Either option can be considered bad or good for the environment depending on who you talk to. But what about a third option that is beautiful, fresh, and environmentally responsible and sustainable?

Choose a real tree, and I don’t just mean a live Christmas tree, I mean Real Christmas Trees in Pots with roots in soil! Yep, you got it. A happy little live tree will light up your home. It is also great for the environment and easier to care for than a cut Christmas tree. You won’t have those annoying dropped pine needles everywhere either! Just water and real Christmas trees in pots will stay happy inside for the couple weeks they functions as holiday décor.

Once the holidays have passed you won’t need to take your Real Christmas Tree apart and stick it back in the attic or garage or drag it through the house to the street getting needles everywhere. Simply move real Christmas trees in pots outside. If the ground isn’t frozen you can plant your live tree right away. If it is, just wait for the spring thaw and plant your tree in the ground then. You can even use your live Christmas Tree next year if you plant it in a larger container and keep it watered.

Choosing Real Christmas Trees in Pots

Be sure to choose a tree appropriate for your growing zone. And keep in mind if you are going to keep it outside in a container most of the year you want a tree that grows in a zone at least 1 cooler than yours. Container plants don’t have the root protection that planted trees do. This is mainly an issue in winter when it is exposed to extremely low temperatures.

Pick a tree you like for scent, color, size, and look. And don't forget you want to like it in your landscape long term as well as in your home as a live Christmas tree short term.

Caring for Real Christmas Trees in Pots Indoors

  1. Water the soil when it begins to dry.
  2. Keep it out of drafts that can dry out and damage the living foliage.
  3. A short time period indoors is ideal for the sustainability of your potted Christmas tree. One to three weeks is ideal. However if your tree is near a window and getting some natural light and watered as needed this time frame can be stretched out even longer.

Planting Real Christmas Trees in Pots After the Holidays

  1. Dig a hole about 2 times the width of the root ball, but about the same depth.
  2. Remove your tree from its container and place in the middle of the hole. Be sure the soil line of the tree is slightly higher than the natural soil line.
  3. Back fill the hole with soil. Tamp it down to remove air pockets, but don’t stomp the soil. This can create compacted soil and make it hard for the roots to grow.
  4. Water your newly planted evergreen tree until it will no longer hold water.
  5. Apply 1 to 2 inches of mulch around the root zone.

For a mini version, try our Small Potted Christmas Tree, a beautiful flocked Cypress.

Now that you know all about Real Christmas Trees in Pots, browse our selection of Evergreen Trees and Tabletop Christmas Trees for home and gift options! If you'd rather have a fresh cut Christmas tree delivered, click here. There are lots of green Christmas tree gifts to choose from at PlantingTree. 

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